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The current tastes of art in the Empire of Grandelumiere are mainly of the Rococo and "Late Baroque". This is an artistic movement and style which cover painting, sculpture, architecture, interior design, literature, music, and theatre.

Baroque (1620-1704)

The earliest example of Baroque art dates from the year 1670 and the considered last of this style was in 1704. The earliest example is defined as such due to its popularity of the new Baroque style and it's overall influence upon this media. It does not signify the exact beginning of the movement for there are earlier portraits which use the Baroque style. The latter date of 1704 is chosen as the last of this movement due to the fact that it is the last official state portrait which expresses Baroque proportion, colour and composition. It would thus afterwards to the new style, dubbed "Late Baroque".

  • Charles VII et Marie Charlotte by Charles Le Brun (1670): The original is held at the Chateau de Saint-Etienne, Bourgogne.
  • Louis X in coronation robes by Hyacinthe Rigaud (1692): The original is held at the Chateau de Saint-Etienne, Bourgogne.
  • Louis X out hunting by Hyacinthe Rigaud (1693): The original is held at the Chateau de Lillemont, Bourgogne.
  • Empress Anastasie as Regent by Peter Paul Rubens (1696 exact date unknown): The original is held at the Chateau de Saint-Etienne, Bourgogne.
  • Young Louis XI by Hyacinthe Rigaud (1704): The original is held at Chateau de Saint-Etienne, Bourgogne.

Though the Baroque style ended at this point, the artist Hyacinthe Rigaud, the court favourite painter as a client of Louis XI, would continue to paint portraits until his death in 1743.

Late Baroque (1704-1740)

After 1704 the former dominant Baroque style began to wane out and became Late Baroque, this period would last until the early 1740's, and existed alongside the Rococo movement.

  • The Coronation of Louis XI by Jean-Baptiste Martin (Specific date unknown): The original is held at the Chateau de Saint-Etienne, Bourgogne.
  • Louis XI coronation by Hyacinthe Rigaud (Specific date unknown): The original was lost during a rebellion in the early 1740's but a second was saved and is held at the Chateau de Saint-Etienne, Bourgogne. This would become the most popular painting to be copied and interpreted into mural and miniature.
  • Empress Elisabeth Justine by Charles van Loo (Specific date unknown): The original version was painted by Hyacinthe Rigaud but was terribly damaged when being moved to the Chateau de Saint-Etienne. The replacement would be painted by Charles van Loo, a favourite painter of the Empress.
  • Louis XI, Madame Viola and Madame Sophie by Pierre Gobert (Unknown)

The Lillemont Collection.

The Lillemont Collection was a series depicting of the Imperial Family and Imperial Court. These were pastel drawings created by Jean-Étienne Liotard. These pictures were lost during the rebellion of the early 1740's after the raid on the Dijon Palace. In all the series took 10 years to create, starting from 1720 and finishing in 1730.

  • Madame Premiere by an unknown artist (1720): This portrait was disputed to have been her for some time, due to the fact that her facial features are not exact to that of the real Madame Premeiere. It was confirmed to be her when the portrait was discovered, along with others in the series, in 1744.
  • Madame Deuxieme by Jean-Étienne Liotard (1720)
  • Louis Auguste by an Jean-Étienne Liotard (1720)
  • Madame Troisieme by Jean-Étienne Liotard (1721)
  • Comte de Jura by Jean-Étienne Liotard (1721)
  • Princess of Brittany by Jean-Étienne Liotard (1721)
  • Madame by Jean-Étienne Liotard (1724)
  • Louis XI on horseback by Jean-Étienne Liotard (1724)
  • Lady upon the chaise by Jean-Étienne Liotard (Unknown)
  • Lady in purple by Jean-Étienne Liotard (Unknown)

Rococo (1720-Present)

Besides the Late Baroque was = the frivolous Rococo. This style was focused more closely on natural form, and moved away from religious themes which dominated in the Baroque style, which would fade closer to the mid-1740's. This era of painting was not favoured by many of the senior members of courtly society but many swallowed their personal tastes and kept up with the fashions, though would, as a result, distance themselves from Louis XI, who kept firmly to his Baroque tastes.